Wednesday, 29 September 2010

EU Consultation on the Future of Lifelong learning and Youth in Action programmes

Make your voice be heard!

The European Commission is currently running the consultations for the Future Youth in Action Program as well as for the Future lifelong learning program. Both are of vital interest for organizations active ine EDC/HRE.

To participate, please fill the online forms here :
Lifelong Learning : http://ec.europa.eu/yourvoice/ipm/forms/dispatch?form=LifelongLearning
and
Youth in Action: http://ec.europa.eu/yourvoice/ipm/forms/dispatch?form=YiA
The consultations results usually have high impact on future programmes.

Monday, 27 September 2010

European Project Planning In Service Training Course in Florence

It is now possible to enrol in the 2011 editions of the European Project Planning and European Project Management in-service training courses. 30 editions of the courses were already successfully carried out between 2005 and 2010.

The courses are included in the Grundtvig/Comenius database http://ec.europa.eu/education/trainingdatabase

European Project Planning course code is IT-2011-631-003.
European Project Management course code IT-2011-630-001.

Therefore those who wish to participate can obtain a training grant to cover both the course fees and accommodation and subsistence costs.

The dates of the European Project Planning course are:
Edition 26: 8th – 12th February 2011
Edition 27: 10th - 14th May 2011
Edition 28: 21st - 25th June 2011
Edition 29: 11th - 15th October 2011

The dates of the European Project Management course are:
Edition 5 – 15th – 19th November 2011

More information available at http://europlan.pixel-online.org

Thursday, 23 September 2010

DARE Video 13: Jessica Garcia on legal literacy and the Magistrates' Court Mock Trial Competetion

Jessica Garcia is responsible for the Magistrates Court Mock Trial Competition. This initiative aims to introduce the legal system to young people in an innovative and exciting way, giving them the opportunity to gain hands on experience. Now in its 17th successful year, the competition involves young people throughout England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; every year over 4,500 young people and 800 magistrates and other legal professionals are involved in the competition.

Students take on the roles of lawyers, witnesses, magistrates and court staff and prepare the prosecution and defense of specially written criminal cases. Teams compete against each other in a live format at Magistrates' Courts with their performances judged by Magistrates and other legal professionals.

Click below for the full interview!



This interview is part of a research project at the Citizenship Foundation) in London, conducted by Anne Stalfort (AdB Germany), and supported through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme (Grundtvig Visits and Exchanges).

The Citizenship Foundation is an independent education and participation charity that aims to encourage and enable individuals to engage in democratic society. Founded in 1989, its particular focus is on developing young people’s citizenship skills, knowledge and understanding of the law, democracy and public life. The Foundation does this by championing civic participation, supporting teachers and schools with the delivery of citizenship education and by working with young people in community-settings on issues that concern them.

For more interviews on citizenship education in the UK, click the following links:

DARE Video 10: Ruxandra Ratiu on concepts of citizenship education in England and Europe

DARE Video 11: Robert Geddis on financial literacy and Paying For It

DARE Video 12: Ade Sofola on youth participation and Youth Act


Check the full DARE video library here.

DARE Video 12: Ade Sofola on youth participation and Youth Act

Ade Sofola is Director of Youth Act, an initiative aimed at engaging young people in political processes. Youth ACT™ supports groups of 11–18 year-olds to identify issues of concern to them and their communities and to develop campaigns to tackle them. Appointed to develop the project nationally, she also trains and supports young people and adults throughout the UK to develop skills and strategies to campaign on issues that affect the lives of their communities.

Click below for the full interview!



This interview is part of a research project at the Citizenship Foundation) in London, conducted by Anne Stalfort (AdB Germany), and supported through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme (Grundtvig Visits and Exchanges).

The Citizenship Foundation is an independent education and participation charity that aims to encourage and enable individuals to engage in democratic society. Founded in 1989, its particular focus is on developing young people’s citizenship skills, knowledge and understanding of the law, democracy and public life. The Foundation does this by championing civic participation, supporting teachers and schools with the delivery of citizenship education and by working with young people in community-settings on issues that concern them.

For more interviews on citizenship education in the UK, click the following links:

DARE Video 10: Ruxandra Ratiu on concepts of citizenship education in England and Europe

DARE Video 11: Robert Geddis on financial literacy and Paying For It

DARE Video 13: Jessica Garcia on legal literacy and the Magistrates' Court Mock Trial Competetion


Check the full DARE video library here.

DARE Video 11: Robert Geddis on financial literacy and Paying For It

Robert Geddis (Project Officer Economic Citizenship at the Citizenship Foundation in London) explains Paying for It, an economic citizenship education programme run in partnership with Aviva UK. The programme includes free teachers' resources, free teacher training, the Chance to be Chancellor competition, and an employee volunteering programme for Aviva staff.

As dividing line between economic literacy and financial literacy, he emphasizes “that financial literacy deals with big issues such as what to do if you get into debt. Economic awareness would be more around why debt exists, what its function is in society – and questioning the purpose it serves from a social and moral point of view.”

Click below for the full interview!



This interview is part of a research project at the Citizenship Foundation) in London, conducted by Anne Stalfort (AdB Germany), and supported through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme (Grundtvig Visits and Exchanges).

The Citizenship Foundation is an independent education and participation charity that aims to encourage and enable individuals to engage in democratic society. Founded in 1989, its particular focus is on developing young people’s citizenship skills, knowledge and understanding of the law, democracy and public life. The Foundation does this by championing civic participation, supporting teachers and schools with the delivery of citizenship education and by working with young people in community-settings on issues that concern them.


For more interviews on citizenship education in the UK, click the following links:

DARE Video 10: Ruxandra Ratiu on concepts of citizenship education in England and Europe

DARE Video 12: Ade Sofola on youth participation and Youth Act

DARE Video 13: Jessica Garcia on legal literacy and the Magistrates' Court Mock Trial Competetion

Check the full DARE video library here.

DARE Video 10: Ruxandra Ratiu on concepts of citizenship education in England and Europe

Ruxandra Ratiu (International Projects Manager at the Citizenship Foundation) explains how citizenship education became a part of the secondary school curricula in England, and outlines the benefits of European cooperation in the field.

Click below for the full interview!



This interview is part of a research project at the Citizenship Foundation) in London, conducted by Anne Stalfort (AdB Germany), and supported through the EU Lifelong Learning Programme (Grundtvig Visits and Exchanges).

The Citizenship Foundation is an independent education and participation charity that aims to encourage and enable individuals to engage in democratic society. Founded in 1989, its particular focus is on developing young people’s citizenship skills, knowledge and understanding of the law, democracy and public life. The Foundation does this by championing civic participation, supporting teachers and schools with the delivery of citizenship education and by working with young people in community-settings on issues that concern them.

"Citizenship is more than a subject. If taught well and tailored to local needs, its skills and values will enhance democratic life for all of us, both rights and responsibilities, beginning in school and radiating out." (Bernard Crick, National Curriculum Citizenship, 1999)

For more interviews on citizenship education in the UK, click the following links:

DARE Video 11: Robert Geddis on financial literacy and Paying For It

DARE Video 12: Ade Sofola on youth participation and Youth Act

DARE Video 13: Jessica Garcia on legal literacy and the Magistrates' Court Mock Trial Competetion


Check the full DARE video library here.

Monday, 20 September 2010

Updates from the Citizenship Foundation

What is InterACT?
InterACT supports groups of 16-25 year old refugees and asylum seekers to come together with locally resident young people, to identify joint issues of concern to them and their communities and to develop campaigns to tackle them.

Through this process the project seeks to break down barriers to integration for young asylum seekers and refugees and build greater community cohesion. It also aims to empower young people to become active citizens in their local communities.

How does it work?
The project, funded by Comic Relief and the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, is based on the Citizenship Foundation’s award winning Youth Act model. We work in partnership with local organisations currently working with young refugees and asylum seekers and locally resident young people. We support partner organisations to deliver free training sessions to groups of up to 30 young people based on Youth Act's training model, covering the areas such as:
- diversity
- communication
- problem solving
- team building and co-operation
- influencing decision makers
- project planning
- campaigning
- fundraising

The young people, with support, will develop and run their own social action projects in their local communities over the summer months.

The project so far:
This year the project is running in Cardiff, Birmingham, Bristol and Swansea.

The Cardiff group are organising a social action project to tackle waste and recycling in the city. The Birmingham group are working on a campaign for more multicultural youth facilities in Birmingham. They will be holding an event on 12 October 2010 and will invite key figures from the police, youth service and Birmingham City Council, and local MPs. The group in Swansea are starting work on a social action project aimed at tackling racism and discrimination in the city.

A youth worker who is working with the Birmingham group said, 'InterACT has really challenged the young people we work with to think differently about young refugees and asylum seekers. It’s been fantastic working with them and watching bonds form between them as they recognise that at the end of the day, they’re all just young people.'

Celebration events to recognise the achievements of the young people will be held later in the autumn, and young people will receive accreditation for their participation in the project.

What is Act Global?
Act Global is a project that engages students with global citizenship and supports them in taking action on poverty related issues. The project has been funded by DFID and is being delivered jointly by Relief International UK and the Citizenship Foundation. Act Global aims to support young people’s learning about global issues, as well as supporting schools in their delivery of citizenship, geography and the global dimension.

Teaching resources are available on the website. These resources cover a range of issues, such as global poverty and violent conflict. They are designed to be used in class and will enhance the student learning experience.

Act Global can offer you:
Act Global units of work
The lessons can be used in a range of subjects and these units of work focus on the same skills to develop the student’s ability to discuss complex issues and think of solutions to them. Each lesson is accompanied by a media-rich PowerPoint.

Online networks
Act Global is a bespoke and safe space for students to meet and discuss global issues with young people from other schools. They can use groups, forums, polls and events to hold debates and plan collaborative actions on issues. This provides an opportunity to link with any partner schools you may have. Experts regularly contribute to this network.
Teach Act Global is a space for Act Global teachers to share experiences and resources as well as keep in touch with the Act Global team.

Act Global After School Clubs
Act Global has specific resources to be used in the extra-curricular or extended schools setting. We have developed full activity plans to develop young people’s skills in global issues, based around actions they can take part in their local community.

To access the free resources and find out more join the Teach Act Global network at www.teachactglobal.org.

The project so far:
This year students from ten schools in London have participated in the Act Global project working alongside students from 18 countries including Bangladesh, Nigeria, Uganda and New Zealand through the dedicated social network. They have examined particular impacts of poverty in their local communities such as violent conflict and migration.

We are holding a Celebration Event on Tuesday 5 October 3-4.30pm at London City Hall. The event seeks to celebrate the campaigns that have been created by young people and to give them an opportunity to present their campaigns to politicians, journalists, policy makers, funders, teachers and youth workers.

Our overall question for the day is: if I can change one thing….

All the presentations and the activities will focus on this key question with a view to re-enforcing the importance of action in providing a solution to global poverty.

Ruxandra Ratiu
International Projects Manager
Citizenship Foundation
63 Gee Street
London EC1V 3RS
+44 (0) 20 7566 4142 (please note that this is my new phone number!)

Letter from the Chair

Dear DARE Network members, friends and colleagues,

This is a time of endings and hopefully new beginnings. Wim Taelman, one of the co-founders and engines behind our network and long-time Board member, has stepped down as Treasurer of DARE. Although I am sure he will continue to be active in the EDC/HRE field, he will be officially retiring from VORMEN this month. Our network is very much indebted to Wim's hard work and inspiration and I wish him all the best in his future endeavours. Wim, we will miss you!

Our Grundtvig funding will also come to an end this year. As you all know, the generous financial support from the European Commission has enabled our network to develop activities, prepare publications, organise trainings and share best practices during the past three years. The last activity within the framework of the EC grant will be "A Europe of Active Citizens: Assessment, Policy Responses and Recommendations on Active Citizenship Education", which will take place in Budapest on 11 November 2010 and is organised by the Active Citizenship Foundation. We hope that the various policy recommendations formulated by DARE over the past years, for the European Commission and other European institutions and governments, will be further elaborated at this international conference and taken up during Hungary's presidency.

As for new beginnings, DARE's General Assembly (Vilnius, 3 July) welcomed seven new full members: the Turkish Cypriotic Human Rights Foundation (Cyprus), Volunteers for Development (VIS) (Italy), Menneskerretigetsakademiet (Norway), Bulgarian Network for Human Rights Education, the Fundamental Rights Agency of the European Union (Austria), Educational Center Tuzla (Bosnia-Hercegovina), and Centre for Peace Research and Peace Education (Austria). The General Assembly also approved a proposal by the Board to develop a new membership fee structure, based on a solidarity principle in which larger organisations will be asked to make larger membership contributions, which will allow our network to develop a larger financial base.

In the meantime, through DARE's Synchronised Action Days 2010 you can showcase the many different activities in the field -- be it a a workshop, a campaign, an art project, a local, regional or international initiative, as long as they up to 10 December, Human Rights Day. DARE collects and disseminates your activities to stakeholders on the local, regional, national and European level. So don't forget to submit the Synchronised Action Days 2010 Activity Report Form on the DARE website: http://www.dare-network.eu!

Wishing you a productive fall,

Frank Elbers

Deliberating in a Democracy – a good practice guide

This quite special book will hopefully give the readers an idea of what some Romanian high school teachers participating in the “Deliberating in a Democracy” Project have been doing for the last three years thanks to a very generous grant offered by the US Department for Education. In July 2007 the “Friendship Ambassadors” Association and some high schools in Dambovita county joined the project carried out by the Street Law Inc. and two branches of the Constitutional Rights Foundation (in Chicago and Los Angeles). The major idea of the project was to provide European and American teenagers with basic competences to deliberate on controversial issues that shape their democracies. The project consisted of class activities, discussion board communication, videoconferences for students as well as teacher training sessions and teacher exchange opportunities. It was evaluated annually by a team based in University of Minnesota
This collection of good practice comprises four main chapters and the translations of the deliberation issues used in Romania. The first chapter refers to some core concepts: public policy, deliberation, democratic principles, participation as well as the major components of the project. It also describes how the project was carried out in Romania (things done by Romanian high school teachers). We present many original materials developed by the initiators of the project and used in various circumstances in Romania. The chapter obviously introduces the SAC (Structured Academic Controversy) to the readers.
The second chapter comprises eight deliberation lessons carried out by eight out of the thirteen teachers participating in the third year of the project. Some lessons were developed cooperatively. Domestic Violence, Juvenile Justice, Cyberbullying, Violent Video Games were the favourite issues of our students and teachers. The structure of the class experiences (the way teachers have described their lessons) illustrates the importance of critical thinking and the crucial role played by the students in the new method.
Chapter three depicts other components of the project (11 activities for students and teachers). From staff development sessions to student conferences, from after-class/community projects to student evaluation and from using SAC in other contexts to grateful description of international conferences and teacher exchanges, the six authors of this section really enjoy sharing their understanding and creativity with the readers.
The fourth chapter is the mind and the soul of the guide in the sense that it illustrates what six participants think about the –s and the +s of the project as a whole, how they developed the method/project beyond their formal responsibilities/duties stemming from the project and what they plan to do with DID once the current grant has been over. It is not surprisingly that the styles and the major features of the texts (diary) are very different, and we hope this will make the real difference for the readers who want “to buy” this very complex and generous offer which is the DID Project.
We have gained a lot by participating in this project and we felt we had to share the experience with other practitioners and, maybe, decision makers in education. This guide is not a civic education recipe, it is not even an exhaustive image of the project. It is just ten educationists’ (in Dambovita county) subjective but still honest perceptions of a really interesting professional and personal challenge that enriched them for several years from now on.

Corina Leca, Romanian project co-ordinator Deliberating in a Democracy (Romania)

Online self-training Course “Understanding to respect the faiths and cultures of Europe” via www.donbosco-humanrights.org platform

A new self-training course “Understanding to respect the faiths and cultures of Europein two languages (Italian and English) is now available on the platform www.donbosco-humanrights.it

The Promoters are the Centro Europeo di Gargnano (Brescia), Italian branch of Insertion (Brussels), the Association Voies de l’Orient with its headquarter in Brussels, the Department of Education of the University of Verona with the collaboration Cepof and Edulife, leading institutions in the production and administration of distant learning.

OBJECTIVES AND BENEFICIARIES: The objective of the project is promoting the capacity of intercultural dialogue and Education to Democratic citizenship of citizens through the prism of interreligious respect. The beneficiaries are young and adult people, that is, all citizens who, as builders of the city, common living space, are called upon the dialogue and reciprocal awareness of their own cultures, even in their religious side.

LEARNING PROGRAMME

The learning programme is composed by four units:

1. Critical incidents
2. Stereotypes
3. Skills necessary for the dialogue
4. Best practices

METHODOLOGY: The course proposes the use of online training methodology as a self-training course, that gives students the opportunity to take the course wherever they may be (with an internet connection) and whenever they can through the use of a computer and, particularly, the web site www.donbosco-humanrights.org ( e-learning section).

Being a self-training course, is possible to make the registration in any useful time.

REGISTRATION: It is enough to download the registration form, into the window “Register”. You will receive an username and password useful to access to the “E-LEARNING” Section.

CONTRIBUTE: Registration and participation to the Course is free.

Online self-training Course on Human Rights Education via www.donbosco-humanrights.org platform

An online self-training Course on Human Rights Education is now available on the www.donbosco-humanrights.org platform.

It is a VIS (Volontariato Internazionale per lo Sviluppo, Italy, www.volint.it) initiative in collaboration with Salesian Department of Youth Ministry.

OBJECTIVES AND BENEFICIARIES: The course, available in Italian, English and Spanish, is addressed to formal and informal educators engaged in working with children and older youth and with people interested in training (and self-training) in education to and for human rights.

The first objective is to give qualification to the different contributions made by formal and informal educators through the updating of knowledge regarding educative and pedagogical techniques relating to education in values and human advancement, and in education to individual and social responsibility for social justice and solidarity.

The course is divided into eight thematic modules. Each module can be utilized independently, even if it has been built as a integrated educative project.

Each module consists of:

1. A thematic scheme of reference

2. The identification of an important day of annual celebration of the theme expressed in the module

3. Some activities proposed to children and young people from 8 to 17 years old. Some musical proposals and films, useful for the specific theme.

4. A glossary of technical terms used for the description of the theme outline.

5. A bibliography of documents used to elaborate the module and related to the theme.

6. A web bibliography, suggestions of web links related to the specific theme.

METHODOLOGY: The course proposes the use of online training methodology as a self-training course, that gives participants the opportunity to take the course wherever they may be (with an internet connection) and whenever they can (considering the timetable of the course) through the use of a computer and, particularly, the web site www.donbosco-humanrights.org (e-learning section).

Being a self-training course, it is possible to make the registration in any useful time. From the moment the first test related to the first module has been compiled, there are 20 weeks useful to compile the course; if it will not compiled within 20 weeks, the access will not be more possible.

A Forum is open and each participant is invited to insert messages that could be a doubt, a provocation, a brief story on an educative experience, a simple question (without waiting for a reply).

Each course module is progressively put up online and available level by level. The evaluation is given by passing the test at the end of each module. Only after having compiled the test and with a positive result, can the participant proceed to the subsequent module.

FINAL TITLE: The participant who has successfully finished with the previous tests will receive a Diploma issued by both the Salesian Youth Ministry and VIS. Each participant will be able to download his own certificate.

REGISTRATION: It is enough to download the registration form, into the window “Register”. You will receive an username and password useful to access to the “E-LEARNING” Section.

CONTRIBUTE: Registration and participation to the Course is free.

Saturday, 18 September 2010

DARE Video 9: Britta Lejon (EAEA) on Europe 2020 and challenges for Adult Education

At the DARE Focus Meeting “Citizenship Reloaded: The Demand for `Active Citizenship´ in Europe and its Implications for Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education (EDC/HRE)" in Vilnius/Lithuania, July 1-3, 2010, 37 stakeholders from 16 European countries explored challenges for EDC/HRE under rapidly changing European policy frames.

In the video below, Britta Lejon (EAEA) explains the challenges of the Europe 2020 program for adult education, and points out that adult education is a part of the solution of the current crisis.



Check the full DARE video library here!


DARE Video 1-4: DARE Conference Nov 2008 on Intercultural Dialogue, interviews with participants, part 1
part 2
part 3
part 4

DARE Video 5: Yulia Pererva (Council of Europe) explains the ratio behind the recently adopted Council of Europe “Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education” and its relevance for NGOs.

DARE Video 6: Niamh O´Reilly (AONTAS) explains how the Irish National Qualification Framework embraces non-formal education, and how that might ultimately lead to obtaining a PHD degree without ever having participated in the formal education systems.

DARE Video 7: Frank Elbers (HREA) on elements of the drafting process of the recently adopted Council of Europe “Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education” and its importance as a lobbying tool for NGOs.

DARE Video 8: Gintaras Stepanovicius, Lithuanian Minister of Education, gives an opening speech at the DARE Conference in Vilnius, July 1, 2010. This video features an part of his speech focusing on the relevance of Human Rights Education and Education for Democratic Citizenship and the key role of NGOs.

DARE Video 8: Gintaras Stepanovicius, Lithuanian Minister of Education, on EDC HRE and NGOs

At the DARE Focus Meeting “Citizenship Reloaded: The Demand for `Active Citizenship´ in Europe and its Implications for Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education (EDC/HRE)" in Vilnius/Lithuania, July 1-3, 2010, 37 stakeholders from 16 European countries explored challenges for EDC/HRE under rapidly changing European policy frames.

Gintaras Stepanovicius, Lithuanian Minister of Education, gave the opening speech to this conference. The video features a part of his speech focusing on the relevance of Human Rights Education and Education for Democratic Citizenship, the key role of NGOs, and the importance of non-uniform approaches in formal and non-formal education.



Check the full DARE video library here!

DARE Video 1-4: DARE Conference Nov 2008 on Intercultural Dialogue, interviews with participants, part 1
part 2
part 3
part 4

DARE Video 5: Yulia Pererva (Council of Europe) explains the ratio behind the recently adopted Council of Europe “Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education” and its relevance for NGOs.

DARE Video 6: Niamh O´Reilly (AONTAS) explains how the Irish National Qualification Framework embraces non-formal education, and how that might ultimately lead to obtaining a PHD degree without ever having participated in the formal education systems.

DARE Video 7: Frank Elbers (HREA) on elements of the drafting process of the recently adopted Council of Europe “Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education” and its importance as a lobbying tool for NGOs.

Friday, 17 September 2010

Exploring Human Rights Dilemmas through Simulations

Humanity in Action has developed innovative simulations on human rights dilemmas for use in youth and adult education.

The topics of the simulations are:
* European Regime Changes in the late 1980
* Transitional Justice in Post-Conflict Societies
* Roma Integration in the European Union
* Segregation vs Integration the Education System in Bosnia-Herzegovina

Simulating conflicts and negotiations provides a playful way of learning and understanding the political dynamics behind them. Participants take the role of the relevant protagonists, have to make a convincing presentation of their position and learn to work towards a compromise acceptable to all.

The simulations manuals (scenario, background information, role cards, guidelines for facilitators) can be downloaded for free here.

Humanity in Action welcomes any feedback from users in order to constantly update the simulation materials. For more information, please contact Anne Stalfort, a.stalfort(at)humanityinaction.org

Thursday, 16 September 2010

International Day of Democracy - 15 September 2010

Democracy vital tool for achieving development, UN Secretary General Ban says on International Day

15 September 2010 – Democracy is an “indispensable” tool to better the lives of people around the world, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today, marking the International Day of Democracy.

This year’s Day falls just days before the start of a three-day gathering at United Nations Headquarters in New York, where world leaders will measure progress with just five years to go before the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the eight globally-agreed targets against poverty, hunger, disease and other social and economic ills.

At next week’s summit, “we have an important opportunity to underline the pivotal role that democracy plays in reducing poverty and promoting human well-being,” Mr. Ban said in his message for the Day.

He noted that at the 2005 World Summit, global leaders agreed that democracy, development and human rights are linked and mutually reinforcing, while in the 2000 Millennium Declaration, all of the world’s governments vowed to “spare no effort” to promote democracy, bolster the rule of law and enhance respect for the right to development.

“Transparency, accountability, and responsive governance are essential if our work for development is to succeed,” the Secretary-General underlined.

Oversight, civil society and the free exchange of ideas are among the hallmarks of democracy essential to spurring economic growth and achieving social justice, he added.

“Democratic advancement is neither a linear nor irreversible process,” Mr. Ban stressed, pointing to serious threats jeopardizing hard-won gains in democratic governance around the world.

“Setbacks in democratic advancement are setbacks for development,” he said, emphasizing that the more people have a genuine say in their own governance, the more development is likely to take hold.

At a General Assembly thematic debate on the Day today, the Secretary-General noted that people the world over look to the UN to help safeguard and promote democracy, human rights and the rule of law.

“We are determined to do just that,” he stressed.

Many of the world body’s entities – including the Department of Political Affairs (DPA), the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) and the UN Development Programme (UNDP) – are working to advance democracy around the globe, the Secretary-General said.

This year’s Day is the third to be celebrated. The General Assembly declared the Day to commemorate the 1997 adoption by the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) of the Universal Declaration on Democracy.

The occasion was marked in the fledgling nation of Timor-Leste with a speech contest for high school students.

More than 145 students from all 13 districts of the South-East Asian nation took part in this year’s competition, whose theme was “As a citizen of Timor-Leste, what does democracy mean to you?”

The final round of the contest – opened by Mr. Ban’s Special Representative Ameerah Haq and Timorese Education Minister João Câncio Freitas – kicked off today in the capital, Dili.

The celebration of the International Day of Democracy “symbolizes Timor’s achievements from post-conflict to democratic nation building,” Ms. Haq said. “Democracy is as much a process as a goal, and only with the full participation of and support by the national governing bodies, civil society, international community, and individuals, can the ideal of democracy be made into a reality to be enjoyed by everyone, everywhere.”

UN News Service

DARE Policy Recommendations on “Active Citizenship Education as guiding principle for Future Lifelong Learning”

The following policy recommendations on “Active Citizenship Education as guiding principle for Future Lifelong Learning” were drafted by the participants of the DARE Focus Meeting “Citizenship Reloaded: The Demand for `Active Citizenship´ in Europe and its Implications for Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education (EDC/HRE)" in Vilnius/Lithuania, July 1-3, 2010. The meeting offered a forum for stakeholders from 16 European countries to assess and discuss the interrelation of EDC/HR and Active Citizenship within the context of Lifelong Learning.


a) Recommendations to Policy Makers

• Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education must be integral parts of all future European Lifelong Learning policies and activities.

Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education (EDC/HRE) are the founding principles of active citizenship. They connect the spheres of individual identity and civil society by bringing in the dimension of democratic values. These democratic values are the link to social cohesion in Europe. Active citizenship is an integral part of any education. Within the development of a future Lifelong Learning programme, the EU needs to refer to the special importance of learning about Human Rights and Democratic Citizenship for a cohesive and prosperous Europe.
As part of the public discourse, active citizenship refers not only to political decision making in democratic societies, but aims to support debate within a society. Legal aspects of citizenship are important but Active Citizenship in Lifelong Learning is a much broader concept than a just legal definition of single rights and duties. Within the EU context promoting active citizenship cannot be reduced to promoting Europe or selected voting rights. A concept of Active Citizenship Education would be of strong support to the EU´s future strategy, as it is related to all areas of life and is of crucial importance for a cohesive and prosperous Europe.

• In light of this moving “citizenship” as policy issue from the Directorate General for Education and Culture (DG EAC) to the Directorate General for Communication (DG COMM) within the European Commission should be reconsidered.
Moving “citizenship” issues from the Directorate General for Education and Culture (DG EAC) to the Directorate General for Communication (DG COMM) represents a move from a policy DG to a general services DG. This risks forfeiting educational knowledge and losing educational providers as the sources of basic skills education. Furthermore, it poses a risk to social cohesion in a future EU strategy.
It should be especially emphasized that the non-formal educational sector within the field of Lifelong Learning is the educational field where the EU through European funding programs has the biggest impact. The European Commission is thus urgently asked to communicate to what extent the educational goals of Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights as guiding principles of Active Citizenship will be further addressed in the Lifelong Learning program.

• Adult Education in a civil society context deserves higher recognition as it has an enormous potential to include learners with limited access to education.

Increasing participation in adult learning is a common goal addressed especially by the EU Grundtvig programme. Yet the gap between the resources of the EU Lifelong Learning program provided to citizens with higher education and those without it is set to become wider, which poses a threat to social cohesion.
The EU stresses the importance of Lifelong Learning and thus the continuous education of adults. It thus seems vital to provide more funds and support where and whenever possible to ensure that this sort of learning can take place. People with higher education are not those at risk of social exclusion in the EU. Therefore, it is of importance to allocate more funds to adult learning programs such as Grundtvig, which addresses all learners.
European learners also need different programmes and trainings. It is up to NGOs to provide this diversity of learning options. Non-formal approaches open up new perspectives for learners, and as such they should gain higher recognition within EU policies. Furthermore, they should not be reduced solely to their contribution to the labour market.
We should not look for a uniform approach in EDC/HRE. Especially in times where our school systems face structural overload from ongoing reforms, we ask that the political sector in Europe put more trust and more support in the non-governmental sector.


All bodies within the EU are asked to operate in a future Lifelong Learning Programme with all Lifelong Learning key competences on the same level. Especially those competences which for now lack indicators may contribute most to a cohesive and prosperous Europe. In the future Lifelong Learning Programme the EU is thus asked to answer the needs of how to further operate with the LLL key competences of “social and civic skills”, the “learning to learn” competences and the key competences of “cultural awareness and expression”.

All bodies within the European Union are asked to support the development of monitoring and evaluation mechanisms in form of a national EDC/HRE policy review.

The European Union is asked to adopt the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education when joining the European Convention on Human Rights. Even if non-binding, the Charter sets a standard that the EU should uphold.

• The European Commission is urgently asked to pay more attention to the strategic implementation of Education for Active Citizenship within the development of all future strategies for Lifelong Learning. The role of NGOs in education needs to be better addressed by the EC.

• Especially the coming Hungarian Presidency is asked to push the Council of Ministers to adopt a Council Conclusion an Education for Active Citizenship.

• The European Parliament is asked to finally make the DROI Committee to a full Committee to be able to monitor and substantially contribute to all policies related to fundamental rights and citizenship within the EU.

The Member States should be clearer about their role within the EU and the Council of Europe. Especially in terms of Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education, we as providers of education have the impression that the left hand does not know what the right hand is doing.
The Member States of the EU and the COE are asked to implement policies supporting Education for Active Citizenship.

• We strongly support the EU Fundamental Rights Agency's (FRA) analysis that Human Rights Education needs to be paid more attention especially within the logic of the funding programs of the European Union.
Nevertheless the Fundamental Rights Agency is asked to build its Human Rights Education strategy on the foundation of the work done by the Council of Europe. The FRA is especially asked to pay more attention on the interrelation of the fields of Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education and the level of quality that the field has achieved within the COE by gathering under one roof.


b) Recommendations to NGOs

NGOs as providers of non-formal education should better monitor the EDC/HRE policies of EU Member States within the EU and Council of Europe contexts.

NGOs should follow up and review on the national level the work of the bodies responsible for the implementation of the World Program for Human Rights Education.

NGOs should engage on the national level with the bodies/persons working with the COE in the EDC/HRE context. NGOs especially should try to follow up on the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education as it promotes their importance within any system of education. EDC/HRE providers should concentrate on equal access for learners. Non-formal education especially enables the addressing of non-academic audiences; NGOs should therefore be keen to set their focus on targeting people outside the academic sphere.

DARE should partner up with the Fundamental Rights Agency. Legitimized through its strong membership base, DARE should do more than just follow up on the agency's policies.


For more information please contact:

Georg Pirker
Secretary of the DARE Network
c/o Arbeitskreis deutscher Bildungsstätten (AdB) e.V.
Mühlendamm 3, 10178 Berlin
pirker@adb.de
www.dare-network.eu

European Projects addressed to Schools

The projects below are coordinated by Pixel (http://www.pixel-online.net), an Education and Training Institution based in Florence, with certified quality system in compliance with the standard UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 and accredited by the Italian Ministry of Education and by the Tuscany County Council.
The projects are addressed to secondary school teachers, with the aim of improving educational methods through the application of new technologies and of supporting interaction and collaboration between schools in different European countries.


The projects are:

1) Routes
The Routes project, funded by the European Commission, in the framework of the Lifelong Learning Programme, aims to open a common reflection at European level on the theme of migration and integration, experimenting an innovative method of studying the evolutions of migration throughout the XX century, based on valorising the potential for exchanging and sharing information of new technologies, for recovering, by means of direct sources and interviews, the historic memory of the countries who have seen both the arrival of migrants and the departure of immigrants in their past.

Specific objectives are:
- Develop e-learning contents addressed to Secondary schools which experiment difficulties in dealing with multicultural classes, in order to enhance the capacity of teachers and pupils to view diversity as a resource to learn about different cultures and habits
- Provide schools with attractive ICT based educational tools to be used in multicultural classes experimenting integration difficulties, to foster dialogue and mutual understanding between pupils with different ethnic backgrounds starting from the knowledge and comprehension of the past experiences of immigrants integration.
- Provide European students with a better comprehension of how immigration has been and will therefore be a resource for the European economy and will facilitate a full integration of the different ethnic groups, based on mutual respect and understanding.

The main project activities are:
- An historical research to understand the migration phenomenon
- Creation of Reports on history of Immigration. Each partner will provide a National analysis of the History of immigration and the contribution given to the economic and social development of their country.
- Creation of an On-line Course focusing on the understanding of the process of integration of immigrants in order to teach teachers the Best practices in the field.

Secondary school teachers and students are invited to participate in the project.
The benefit for the participating schools is that they will have free access to:
- Reviews of Legislation Acts and Publications related to emigration available on the Routes Portal
- Collection of Interviews with eye witnesses and case studies carried out on these interviews, all available on the Routes Portal
- National and Transnational Report on the history of migration and the contribution given to the economic and social development of each country.
- On-line Course focusing on the understanding of the process of integration of immigrants in order to teach teachers the Best practices in the field and give a valuable tool for class lessons.
- Participation with other European teachers at transnational virtual meetings on the topic of the online course moderated directly by the project partners.

For more information:
The Project Portal: http://routes.pixel-online.org/
Pixel web site: http://pixel-online.net
Project coordinator e-mail address: elisabetta@pixel-online.net

2) Embed

Embedding Dyslexia-Responsive Practices in Lifelong Learning is an international project to support the dyslexic individual all over Europe.
The collaboration of 6 countries is supported by the Lifelong Learning Programme of the Education, Audiovisual, Culture executive Agency of the European Union. The project relies on knowledge and outcomes accumulated in 10 years work of dyslexia supporting EU projects.

The main project activities are;
- to offer tools designed for the individuals (teacher, head teachers, parent and support professionals) to identify strengths and weaknesses in key competency necessary for identification, teaching and supporting the dyslexic individual.
- to offers information, educational content and useful tools for dyslexic adults as well as their supporters and employees, especially to European citizens that are dyslexic whose access to education, information and equality of chances in many areas of life needs to be supported.
- to provide access to the technology that is available across Europe to support the dyslexic individual. The project makes available several links to useful online assistive tools.

Project Results
- tools to help identify key issues around dyslexia in childhood.
- Paper based and electronic based assessment tool for children and adult
-Tools to help identify needs, competencies and implementation to assist
in identification of issues related to ICT in different contexts (schools, colleges, manufacturers, professional support staff etc
- Analysis Report of use, compliance, strengths and weaknesses of Dyslexia related policies in order to assist in identification of issues related to policies in different contexts from government, local authority and institutions, the need to comply, and the range of issues that need to be considered.

For more information:
The Project Portal: http://www.embeddyslexia.eu/
Pixel web site: http://pixel-online.net
Project national coordinator e-mail address: elisabetta@pixel-online.net

3) LeTS Go Project

The LeTS Go Project is coordinated by Pixel (Italy), in collaboration with teachers and trainers training centers of 5 different European countries (i.e. Italy, Germany, Poland, Romania and Spain). The project is funded by the Lifelong Learning Programme – Leonardo da Vinci - Transfer of Innovation sub programme.

Specific objectives are:
The aim of the project is to promote the practical experimentation of the LeTS for the application of e-learning in language teaching. The LetS Go project is addressed to language school teachers and professional trainers. The aim is to enable them to:
• choose quality language teaching products identifying those that best meet specific educational needs.
• use the products available either as an alternative or as integration of traditional methodologies.
• create educational and training products that exploit the potential of new technologies.
The platform, which has received the European Language Label in 2010, provide language teachers and trainers with several didactics resources
such as: • database of teachers’ and trainers’ experiences in the field of application of e-learning to language education and training.
• database of reviews of e-learning based language teaching and learning products
• 4 on line courses addressed to language teachers willing to make an effective use of new technologies in language teaching In order to further disseminate the information about the LeTS GO Project, Pixel organizes, in Florence (Italy) on 11 – 12 November 2010, an international conference on the topic “ICT for Language Learning”. More information about the conference are available at:
http://www.pixel-online.net/ICT4LL2010.

For more information:
Project Portal: http://www.leonardo-lets.net
Pixel web site: http://pixel-online.net
Project coordinator e-mail address: lorenzo@pixel-online.net

Dr. Stefano Zanini, Assistant Project Manager, Pixel

Global Education Newsletter Nº 73 - Summer 2010

Global Education News is an electronic newsletter where national global education coordinators or practitioners can share global education news and best practices, useful thematic links and educational materials. It also serves as a medium for the North-South Centre global education network national coordinators' own use.

Dear educators,
Dear friends,

In the context of NSC 20th anniversary celebration, we would like to invite you to get acquainted to the outcomes of the Round Table "The 21st Century, a century of global interdependence and solidarity" among other events organised for the anniversary.
Meanwhile, we are pleased to share the outcomes of the 2nd African University on Youth and Development held in Cape Verde, in July and part of the NSC Euro-African Youth empowerment policy which will culminate with the forthcoming Euro-African Youth Summit. Still on the capacity-building domain, please note that you can have access to the translated versions of the Global Education Guideline - French, Portuguese, Spanish and Slovenian versions - through its webpage. Least but not last, the next Global Education on-line training course will take place from September 27 to October 22. Deadline for applications is 15 September. Complete information and application procedure are also available from its webpage.
You will also find in this issue information related to the World Youth Conference, as well as Human Rights and Gender international issues. Also interesting articles under the Sustainable Development entry, §7, and lots of proposals for training courses under §5 and international events under §6.

Wishing you a captivating and enjoyable reading!
Link to the newsletter

„Free and responsible” – joint human rights education programme for Hungarian high-schools and communities

This unique program is the joint effort of several activist NGOs and one government agency which work on topics ranging from sustainability, youth work and women’s rights to the work with disadvantaged groups such as ethnic minorities or the homeless. In the pilot phase the NGOs joined forces to offer a whole semester of human rights education workshops, each time a different organisation providing educational activities within their expertise. The coordinators of the programme worked closely with the schools in order to prepare and to process the workshops provided by members of the cooperation.

The joint human rights education programme is entering its second phase in September 2010. The cooperating NGOs will continue to offer their human rights education package to high-schools, however, a larger-scale action will also start to take place: community-based human rights education. This programme aims to consolidate the level of sensitivity to human rights violation in a given local community, as well as to support them in discovering the potential for local action for human rights and human rights education. Participants of the community-based programme are local young people and representatives of the organisations and institutions that work with them.

Participating organisations are: Active Citizenship Foundation (coordinator), Mobilitas Youth Service, Amnesty International Hungary, Haver Foundation, Labrisz Association, NANE Women’s Rights Association, Menedék Association, Szimpozion Association, and Streetwork Association.

Enikő Pap, Active Citizenship Foundation (Hungary)

New publication: Students' Perspectives on Schooling

Students' Perspectives on Schooling explores how schools might be transformed for the better, by giving greater weight to the views of students in line with the provisions of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Osler explores various arguments for involving learners in decision-making processes, including:

* The potential benefits to schools and the wider community
* Moral and legal reasons based on human rights principles
* Gaining fresh insights into the processes of teaching and learning

Firmly grounded in research, it analyses data collected from young people living in both the UK and US. Almost 2000 students reported on their current education provision and the degree to which they felt it met their needs. In keeping with the spirit of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Students' Perspectives on Schooling engages with the voices of these young people to consider how they might inform educational policy making.

It argues that consulting young people is not only beneficial to the everyday life of schools, but that the future health of democratic societies demands that we re-think relationships between adults and young people.

A must read for teachers, school leaders, educational researchers, and anyone involved with children's rights and educational policy-making and planning.

Audrey Osler is visiting Professor at Birkbeck, University of London and the University of Leeds, UK, where she was Founding Director of the Centre for Citizenship and Human Rights Education.

Students' Perspectives on Schooling
Audrey Osler
ISBN: 9780335223602
Open University Press (McGraw Hill)
Publication date 31 May 2010
www.openup.co.uk/osler

„Dream Citizen” – an educational programme on active citizenship for schools

Active Citizenship Foundation is reaching the end of a 2-year process of developing an educational package on active citizenship to be used in schools with children between 10 and 14 years old.

The „Dream Citizen” programme’s main aim is to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes of 10-14 years old children in relation to active citizenship in general, and by using the programme to change the school climate into an environment that nurtures democratic values and a respect for human rights.

The package has two distinct parts that support the running of the two phases of the program: in the foundation phase children acquire basic information, skills and values in relation to the different aspects of active citizenship. These activities are designed in a way that they can be run during regular class hours. Topics covered include: democracy, individual and collective identity, environmental sustainability, human rights, children’s rights, violence and conflict, responsibility, enterpreneurship, discrimination.
The other part of the package is the project phase, which consists of microprojects (activities that might take up half-a-day or a full day) through which children prepare a functioning mini-democracy. The microprojects intend to cover certain monumental aspects of a democracy-at-work: democratic foundations (constitution, symbols, elected decision-makers, currency), economy (enterprises, labour market, taxes), sustainability (environmental projects), civil society (setting up NGOs for different purposes), and justice (court to try those who offend the laws of the children’s democracy).
After the preparation is over, the children then operate their democracy with functioning businesses, NGOs, judicial events, etc. for one or several days, with members of the community, parents, etc. acting as „visitors arriving from other countries-democracies”.

The development process involved a group of experts and practicioners from different fields; and it also featured a testing phase in which teachers provided structured feedback from their real-life experiences from using the activities. During the summer a teacher training course was accredited and a group of teachers has been trained in the use of the package. They will also be the first ones to try the package in its entirety: their feedback will be used for the finalisation of the text of the package.

Enikő Pap, Active Citizenship Foundation (Hungary)

BEMIS film events in Human Rights Education 2010/2011

BEMIS is screening series of Human Rights Education events in Scotland, Empowering Scotland's diverse Ethnic and Cultural Minority & Migrant Communities, in partnership with Glasgow University GRAMNet.

Human rights education is a long-term and lifelong process by which all people at all levels of development and in all strata of society learn respect for the dignity of others and the means and methods of ensuring that respect in all societies…(it) significantly contributes to promoting equality and sustainable development, preventing conflict and human rights violations and enhancing participation and democratic processes, with a view to developing societies in which all human rights are valued and respected.
(UN Commission on Human Rights, Resolution 2004/71)

The proposed plan which covers some of the main United Nations Observances, concerns itself with issues vis-à-vis human rights in general, and more specifically with issues relevant to both GRAMNet and BEMIS’ activities. The film series planned throughout the year represent an excellent example of Human Rights Education among the general public. Through the visual arts political education and human rights education can be realized in a more cutting edge fashion. The venue screening will be shown is in the heart of the city, brings together academia and the general public in a space which empowers interactions and exchanges. BEMIS’ screening on human rights and inclusion brings about another dimension to the human rights education through visual art. BEMIS support in human rights education ensures a wider participation of the third sector, its stakeholders and allows for a more participatory role of the diverse ethnic minorities and migrant communities. This initial plan could represent a pilot project to be developed and extend in the coming years (with a possibly larger scope, audience, etc).

Below is the list of films BEMIS will be showing from 6th October 2010 -2011.


Arthur Balfour and Me (Scotland 2007)

By Charlotte Cornic (11 min)
What links Arthur J Balfour, the British Politician, born in 1848 on a sumptuous family estate in East Lothian and Fatima, a young Palestinian woman, born in 1971 in a refugee camp in Lebanon and now seeking asylum in Glasgow? From the beautiful farming landscape of East Lothian to the narrow alley ways of a refugee camp in Lebanon, Arthur Balfour and Me is a visual and emotional journey through history and present time; a hidden story about how one politician’s actions continue to affect the life of a young woman from the Middle East.

El Yajour ( Scotland 2007)
By Fatima Helow (20 min)
El Yajour village is situated in the northeast district of Haifa city in Historical Palestine. It was one of many towns and cities directly affected by the Israeli occupation of historical Palestine and most of the village’s inhabitants fled in 1948 and never saw it again. Most of them still live in refugee camps; some of them live in Diaspora. In this film, Fatima, a Palestinian student living in Glasgow explores the history of the village and of its people prior to 1948 until now.

Turtles can fly (2004)
By Bahman Ghobadi (98 min)
From acclaimed director Bahman Ghobadi (A Time for Drunken Horses) comes the first film shot in Iraq since the fall of Saddam Hussein. Heart-wrenching as well as spirit-raising, Turtles Can Fly mixes humor and tragedy to startling effect, resulting in a very timely masterpiece about children struggling to survive in an endless war zone. On the Iraqi-Turkish border, enterprising 13-year-old 'satellite (Soran Ebrahim) is the de facto leader of a Kurdish village, thanks to his ability to install satellite dishes and translate news of the pending US invasion. Organizing fellow orphans into landmine-collection teams so that they can eke out a living, he is all business until the arrival of a clairvoyant boy and his quiet, beautiful sister.
(Warning: This is a film full of disturbing images: violence, rape, maiming and suicide of children, so sensitive viewers beware. It is slow to start off, but is an ultimately rewarding journey of the horrors of war and the fate of the marginalized, orphaned children that war produces.)

In this World (2002)
By Michael Winterbottom (89 min)
Torn straight from the headlines, Michael Winterbottom's compelling and prescient 'In This World' follows young Afghan Jamal and his older cousin Enayat as they embark on a hazardous overland trip from their refugee camp at Peshawar, north-west Pakistan. Entering Turkey on foot through a snowy, Kurdish-controlled pass, the pair again take their lives into their hands and face suffocation when they are locked in a freight container on a ship bound for Italy. From there they plan to travel on to Paris, the Sangatte refuge centre and ultimately asylum in London.
The film depicts the human face of immigration, and one too often hidden from the eyes of the world.

Rancho California (Por Favor) (2003)
By John Caldwell (59 min)
This thought-provoking, widely acclaimed visual essay provides a troubling journey through migrant farmworker camps in suburban southern California, where homeless indigenous Mixteco workers coexist near gated designerhome enclaves in Carlsbad, La Costa, Encinitas, and Del Mar. In a remarkable feat of artistic and political fusion, the film explores the charged debate over the meaning and consequences of immigrant culture near America's southern border, and along the way examines the complex realities of race and class in this country."Rancho California" begins by working through a set of media ideals about social participation and self-representation, but finally finds layers of complicity at the center of the region's economy. Blending keen observation and insightful commentary, the film illustrates how racial identity and social roles are carefully cultivated parts of the landscape in a new "suburban plantation culture.

Lilya 4-ever (2002)
By Lukas Moodysson (109 min)
This Swedish film depicting the struggles of Lilja (Okshana Akinshina), a16- year-old girl living in an unidentified ex-Soviet republic. Her mother abandons her in the slums of the city to move to the United States, and she is forced to move into in a squalid apartment with only her abused 11-year-old friend, Volodya (Artiom Bogucharskij), for care or company. As the two begin to starve, Lilja turns to prostitution as a way to support herself. When Swedish businessman Andrei (Panel Ponomaryov) appears and promises to save Lilja from the slums, her situation appears to be improving, but it is only the beginning of the problems she will face. "Lilja 4-Ever" deals with trafficking of women for prostitution, an issue which has become relevant not only in Europe, but in other parts of the world as well. In Europe women are most often transported from poorer Eastern countries to the more prosperous West, often under false pretences as shown in this film.

The Edge of Heaven (2007)
By Fatih Akin (116 min)
Faith Akin, renowned for his energetic movie 'Gegen die Wand' (Against the Wall), brings another story about the Turkish-German community. The movie focuses on three families who are all connected in some way. In a beautiful way Akin shows the struggle of a Turkish prostitute, a professor of German literature, a young Turkish rebel, a German student and her mother to find peace and happiness in their lives. The movie also depicts the impact of globalization and multiculturalism in nowadays Germany and Turkey. It's the most debated topic of our time. To what extent do we want newcomers to adapt to their new surroundings and to what extent do we accept them to cherish their own cultural heritage. In an even broader perspective, it deals with the clash between the Islamic and western world.

Lemon Tree (2008)
By Eran Riklis (106 min)
An outstandingly good film. The director tackles the Israel-Palestinian conflict by focusing on how it impinges on one Arab widow (the wonderful Hiam Abbass) who tries to scrape a living from her grove of lemon trees. Salma Zidane is a Palestinian widow who wakes up one morning to see her new neighbour is the Israeli Defense Minister. He has to have her lemon trees chopped down for security reasons. Salmon and her lemon trees are inseparable. The whole civil and legal structures of the Israeli court system comes down on Salma in this film as she fights through the Israeli Court system not to have her lemon orchard destroyed.
The great merit of this film lies in the way the political theme, interesting enough on its own, is entwined with private dramas going on in the lives of the widow, the lawyer she engages to fight her case, and the minister's wife who is brought to perceive the human cost of a political decision in which she is implicated. These interlinked public and private themes are delicately handled, with just the right amount of weight being given to each.

Arna’s Children (2003)
By Danniel Danniel and Juliano Per
"Arna's Children" is indeed a very powerful film. It conveys a message which transcends ethnicity, religion, and class. The film is about an old Israeli Jew who marries a Palestinian Arab and builds a Children's Theatre in the Jenin Refugee Camp. The story follows the children of Arna through their early years in this wonderful theatre until the Israel Defense Forces attack the camp in 2002. The violence breaks as the children, who had once aspired to become great classical actors, set to defend the camp.

Tanveer Parnez, BEMIS

Call for Candidates for the UNESCO/Bilbao Prize for the Promotion of a Culture of Human Rights 2010

UNESCO is inviting Member States, in consultation with their National Commissions, and non-governmental organizations maintaining formal relations with UNESCO working in the field of human rights, to nominate candidates for the second edition of the UNESCO/Bilbao Prize for the Promotion of a Culture of Human Rights.The Prize is awarded to encourage innovative initiatives by institutions, organizations and individuals, serving to promote a culture of human rights at regional and international levels.

The Prize was established in 2008 thanks to a generous endowment from the City of Bilbao (Spain). It enlarges the scope of the UNESCO Prize for Human Rights Education (1978-2006). Awarded by the Director-General of UNESCO, the Prize consists of a monetary award, a diploma and a trophy.

Nominations should be submitted using a form, which should be duly filled out in English or French and returned by 8 September 2010 at the latest.

The 2010 award ceremony will be held in Bilbao on 10 December 2010 – Human Rights Day.

Download the nomination form in Word format [51 KB] or in PDF format [88 KB]

Contacts

Ms Angela Melo
Director, Division of Human Rights, Human Security and Philosophy
Secretary of the UNESCO/Bilbao Prize
UNESCO, 1 rue Miollis
75732 Paris Cedex 15 France
Tel. : +33 (0)1 45 68 38 17 / +33 (0)1 45 68 38 22
Fax : +33 (0)1 45 68 57 26
E-mail: a.melo(at)unesco.org

Please also send a copy to:
Ms Irina Zoubenko-Laplante
Assistant Programme Specialist
E-mail: i.zoubenko-laplante(at)unesco.org

Sonnenberg is planning another Spring Academy on Human Rights education



After the great success of 2009 “Methods of Human Rights Education in Youth Work”, we plan to facilitate another training course for international multipliers focusing on a certain aspect of Human Rights Education activities. The training course is going to take place at International House Sonnenberg in the beautiful Harz Mountains (Germany) from April 4th to 11th 2011.

As for our current planning and ideas, the course will mainly deal with the question: How to teach Human Rights in a creative way? To find answers, we will look into different methodological approaches using the creativity of participants, such as theatre, film, painting and other artistic activities. The idea is to equip multipliers with creative methods they can use to support young people develop artistic products or materials dealing with the topic of Human Rights. Thus the issue of Human Rights and Human Rights Education will become more visible within youth groups, organisations and local communities all over Europe.

In order to have a good mixture of multipliers participating, we are looking for partners from up to ten different EU states that would be willing to send between 3 and 6 young multipliers (aged 18-30), active in the field of youth work. This can be students of educational subjects, voluntary youth leaders or young teachers, who would like to work on Human Rights related topics with their classes or youth groups.

In addition, we are also seeking for experts, actively using creative methods in the context of Human Rights education. If you work in this field, e.g. with filming, painting or alike approaches, we would love to have you running a two days workshop at our training course!

If you are interested or need more information, please contact: Katja Pötzsch-Martin, Tel.: +49-(0)5582-944-148 or -0.

Katja Pötzsch-Martin, Internationalen Haus Sonnenberg

”Will they become subjects or citizens?” Young people’s active citizenship competences in Hungary – a secondary analysis of international databases an

The Active Citizenship Foundation, Hungary carried out a secondary research analysis in partnership with the TÁRKI-TUDOK Knowledge Management and Educational Research Centre. Our study aimed to examine how young people define the concept of citizenship, and whether this awareness goes hand in hand with such values and skills that promote democratic action.

Our research arrived at the conclusion that the social and political activity of young people in Hungary is low by international standards. The results suggest that young people have a constant sense of disenchantment with politics, which manifests in a lack of confidence and interest, and which leads to an absence of action. Studies also confirmed that Hungarian students are not able to capture the essence of democracy.

A number of signs indicate, in parallel, that schools cannot or do not want to take on the role of implementing citizenship education. The Hungarian school system is organized along the lines of mere transmission of information, while teacher training and postgraduate education almost totally neglects the emphasis on democracy and active citizenship education.

But the research results also suggest that young people have an interest in expressing their views and to participate in decision making, if they get the opportunity. Both the school system, and the non-governmental sphere should reflect over this need.

The whole research report and its summary in Hungarian, and the executive summary in English are available on the website of the Active Citizenship Foundation, Hungary (www.aktivpolgar.hu).

Enikő Pap