Thursday, 17 December 2015

"EDC for All" game package: S+intro and ja!do - ready for sendout!!!


Here they are: two brand new educational games ready for sendout to the EDC/HRE community: 
The supernice looking EDC for ALL game sets include the two newly developed games ja/do and S*intro. The games have been developed as part of the EU supported "EDC for All"- project. 

Based on an EDC games stocktaking study both games have been developed by educational experts from 3 countries and have been extensively tested and reviewed in dozens of non-formal educational trainings during the last two years in Europe and beyond. Both proove to make the difference. 
The games offer unique easy entry educational approaches to soundly work with any group of people on questions of justice and equality,  participation and inlcusion and have the potential to boost EDC work to another dimension.

The game set is availably in three languages: English, Portugese and German.
If you are interested to make use of them and want to order a set please send an email to pirker@adb.de .

More information on the project EDC for all you can find on www.edcforall.eu






Thursday, 10 December 2015

Unicef - Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship



ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE children participation.



The following is the third of three relevant materials from Unicef.

Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship is an educational essay for practitioners working on children rights and children participation education.

A nation is democratic to the extent that its citizens are involved, particularly at the community level. The confidence and competence to be involved must be gradually acquired through practice. It is for this reason that there should be gradually increasing opportunities for children to participate in any aspiring democracy, and particularly in those nations already convinced that they are democratic. With the growth of children’s rights we are beginning to see an increasing recognition of children’s abilities to speak for themselves. Regrettably, while children’s and youths’ participation does occur in different degrees around the world, it is often exploitative or frivolous.

This Essay is written for people who know that young people have something to say but who would like to reflect further on the process. It is also written for those people who have it in their power to assist children in having a voice, but who, unwittingly or not, trivialize their involvement.

For more information and link to the pdf version of the document, follow this link:

http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/100

Thursday, 3 December 2015

UNICEF Child Rights Education Toolkit: Rooting Child Rights in Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Schools


 
ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE children participation.



The following is the second of three relevant materials from Unicef.

UNICEF Child Rights Education Toolkit: Rooting Child Rights in Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Schools is a toolkit for practitioners working on children rights education.

The toolkit defines what is meant by child rights education and the child rights approach. The toolkit explains the relevance of child rights education to UNICEF’s mission and the ways in which education can take place in a range of contexts--including with professionals, caregivers, the corporate sector, the media, and children’s groups.

The toolkit uses the metaphor of a tree to explore child rights education in the context of school-based initiatives that promote learning about rights, learning through rights (using rights as an organizing principle to transform the culture of learning) and learning for rights (taking action to realize rights), in an overall context of learning as a right. It contains a range of practical tools, checklists, mapping exercises, project examples and evidence of the benefits of high quality child rights education.

Although the approaches in the toolkit are relevant for all countries, this is the first edition and focuses on the work of National Committees in high-income countries. A second edition in the future will also cover the related work of UNICEF country offices.


For more information and link to the pdf version of the document, follow this link:

http://www.unicef.org/crc/index_30184.html

Thursday, 26 November 2015

Teaching and Learning about Child Rights: A study of implementation in 26 countries


 
ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE children participation.



The following is the first of three relevant materials from Unicef.

Teaching and Learning about Child Rights: A study of implementation in 26 countries is a research about the situation and good practices on promotion of children rights and children rights education from 2015.


UNICEF distributed this research to contribute to the global debate on child rights education. This study explores child rights education in early childhood education, primary and secondary schools in 26 countries with a UNICEF National Committee presence. It includes a literature review, results from an on-line survey completed by national experts, seven country case studies and a series of benchmarking statements to guide implementation of child rights education.

The online survey explores child rights education in the curriculum, teacher education and teacher qualifications, the existence of student councils, and monitoring mechanisms regarding the quality of child rights education. The benchmarking statements are divided into seven areas: official curriculum, teacher education, resources, pedagogy, policy alignment across the education system, participation as a right, and monitoring and accountability.

For more information and link to the pdf version of the document, follow this link:

http://www.unicef.org/crc/index_30184.html

Thursday, 19 November 2015

Putting Children at the Centre: A practical guide to Children's Participation


ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship.

 We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE on the topic of children participation.



 Putting Children at the Centre: A practical guide to Children's Participation is a practical guide made in 2010 by the international organization Save the Children.

 This guide is designed for people working with children and provides advice on ways for practitioners to support children's meaningful participation in the different layers of society, including involvement in the governance, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of their work.

The guide is divided into two sections:

Part 1 provides an introduction to children’s participation in practice.

Part 2 comprises a set of separate guides focusing on specific themes: governance, advocacy, fundraising, recruitment, media and communications, and emergencies.
in the governance, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of their work. - See more at: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/putting-children-centre-practical-guide-childrens-participation#sthash.h6S5My6m.dpuf
advice on ways for practitioners to support children’s meaningful involvement in the governance, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of their work. It is divided into two sections:
Part 1 provides an introduction to children’s participation in practice.
Part 2 comprises a set of separate guides focusing on specific themes: governance, advocacy, fundraising, recruitment, media and communications, and emergencies.
- See more at: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/putting-children-centre-practical-guide-childrens-participation#sthash.h6S5My6m.dpuf
advice on ways for practitioners to support children’s meaningful involvement in the governance, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of their work. It is divided into two sections:
Part 1 provides an introduction to children’s participation in practice.
Part 2 comprises a set of separate guides focusing on specific themes: governance, advocacy, fundraising, recruitment, media and communications, and emergencies.
- See more at: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/putting-children-centre-practical-guide-childrens-participation#sthash.h6S5My6m.dpuf
advice on ways for practitioners to support children’s meaningful involvement in the governance, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of their work. It is divided into two sections:
Part 1 provides an introduction to children’s participation in practice.
Part 2 comprises a set of separate guides focusing on specific themes: governance, advocacy, fundraising, recruitment, media and communications, and emergencies.
- See more at: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/putting-children-centre-practical-guide-childrens-participation#sthash.h6S5My6m.dpuf

 For more information and the pdf manual here you have the direct link:

http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/putting-children-centre-practical-guide-childrens-participation

Thursday, 12 November 2015

KidsRights Index 2015: Countries worldwide fail to protect children's rights


 ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE about children rights and participation.


 This month of October 2015, KidsRights, the international children’s rights foundation, published the KidsRights Index 2015, which ranks how countries adhere to and are equipped to improve children’s rights.

The Index shows that countries worldwide should do more to create an adequate ‘Enabling Environment’ for practically implementing children’s rights.

KidsRights found that all 165 countries analysed in the Index should increase their efforts in allocating the highest available budget to children’s rights, creating a legislative framework that reflects the best interests of the child, as well as in collecting and analysing data on children’s rights.


The Index also shows that there is work to be done to improve children’s participation in society. Marc Dullaert, founder and chairman of the KidsRights Foundation, has long argued for increased involvement of children in policy making: “Children are much more than mere recipients of aid, they have in them the power to bring about change. So their voice should be heard on matters that directly affect them.” Moreover, countries score poorly with respect to non-discrimination, and need to ensure that marginalised groups of children are not discriminated against.







These indicators constitute an important part of the KidsRights Index, because they tell us the extent to which the Committee on the Rights of the Child believes that countries are equipped to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Index shows that all 165 measured countries could do more to create an adequate enabling environment to guarantee children’s rights.
A striking conclusion is that economically better performing countries do not always perform well in honouring children’s rights in practice. New Zealand, Italy and Canada, for example, could improve their legislative infrastructure. They score especially poorly on ensuring that the best interests of the child are manifested in legislation and policies.

Notably, a number of African countries, including Benin, Mauritania and Zambia score remarkably high on providing an enabling environment for child rights. However, these countries still rank relatively low in the overall Index as they fail to meet acceptable standards in other areas, including protection of children’s rights and access to education and health. All countries examined by the Index score particularly poorly on non-discrimination.



 You can find more detailed information in the following website.

http://www.kidsrightsindex.org/OverallIndex.aspx






Monday, 19 October 2015

Origins of Human Rights

Samuel Moyn, Professor of Law and History at Harvard University, published "On the origins of human rights" in eutopia, the "Ideas for Europe Magazine": 
"The recent crisis over refugees is a valuable reminder of a dark past that Europeans often like to forget. In so many ways, especially since the end of the Cold War, Europeans have celebrated human rights as their most impressive contribution to world affairs. It was tempting to see, rather than the fundamental European contributions of capitalism and power politics, human rights as most expressive of the continent’s spirit. The truth, of course, is otherwise."

Friday, 16 October 2015

The new DARE board is elected

At the General Assembly 2015, held on 29th September in Oslo the DARE members elected a new board.

from left toright:
Ms Viviana De Paola, board member  (EIP Italy), Ms Borislava Daskalova, DARE chairperson (Bulgarian Network for Human Rights Education, 2nd from left), Mr Matia Losego, board member (dinamo, Portugal) Mr Sulev Valdmaa, treasurer (Jan Tönissöni Institute, Estonia), Ms Lillian Hjorth, board secretary (HR Academy, Norway), Ms Tanveer Parnez, vice-chair, (BEMIS UK). The new board will meet from 8-9 november 2015 in Berlin for its first session and clarify responsiblities and tasks.

Wednesday, 14 October 2015

Climate Change and Human Rights

In this TED Talk, Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland (1990-1997) and United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002), makes the case for climate justice: "Climate change is the biggest threat for human rights in the 21st century." 2015 is a decisive year...

Friday, 2 October 2015

ENGAGE members materials - polis – The Austrian Centre for Citizenship Education in Schools


ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE created by the members of the consortium.



Polis, Austrian member of ENGAGE, is the central education service institution for citizenship education in schools in Austria.

PraxisBoerse
http://praxisboerse.politik-lernen.at




This is their Best Practice Archive on citizenship education: Within the online database of the best practice archive provided by Zentrum polis, teachers and multipliers find teaching suggestions, lesson plans and practical ideas for projects that can be carried out in the classroom.


The entries can be sorted according to topics and school levels. In addition, a keyword search feature is also available. The data base comprises topics such as “children´s rights”, “human rights”, “education for sustainable development”, “”European citizenship education”, “remembrance”, “economic and consumer education” and much more.

There are about 25 of examples for "classroom exercises / lesson plans/ practical ideas" on children´s rights in their Best Practice Archive. About 15 of these examples would suit ENGAGE projects age group 8-12 years. These are some examples of them.


What all children do need.
www.politik-lernen.at/site/praxisboerse/unterrichtsideen/article/103835.html


This is a group working method. In groups of two, students compile a list of things they can´t go without in their life. Afterwards these lists are compared in class and discussed within the whole group.







“Guessing rights”:
www.politik-lernen.at/site/praxisboerse/unterrichtsideen/article/103762.html



One after another, students draw or mime children´s rights and the other students try to guess which right is being shown:




“All children work”:
www.politik-lernen.at/site/praxisboerse/unterrichtsideen/article/106509.html



The exercise encourages the students to deal with different forms of work – e.g. working for a living, helping in the family or with friends and exploitation.



A day in the life of Uanda:
www.politik-lernen.at/site/praxisboerse/unterrichtsideen/article/106510.html

 Students read a story about the everyday life of a girl named Uanda, living in Nicaragua, and compare their own daily routine with the routine of children living in other countries.




This toolbox with practical examples was one of the examples from our Austrian member creations, in the next blog entry we will continue with more of the partners.


Friday, 25 September 2015

ENGAGE members materials - Volunteering Matters



ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE created by the members of the consortium.

Volunteering Matters, ENGAGE member from UK is by itself a strong consortium of experts from different networks.

David Kerr, Consultant Director of Education, is part of this consortium. He is behind the Citizenship Foundation.

Citizenship Foundation-
http://www.citizenshipfoundation.org.uk/index.php


The Citizenship Foundation inspires young people to take part in society as equal members. They help them to understand the law, politics and democratic life. They promote participation, help teachers to teach citizenship and work with young people on issues that concern them. They want society to be fairer, more inclusive and more cohesive. They want a democracy in which everyone has the knowledge, skills, and confidence to take part as effective citizens.

Their website includes a wide range of citizenship material that is currently used in the classroom. The material covers the full age range of compulsory education as well as SEN and adult education. The website also provides free access to publications and academic work on the area of citizenship education.

This was one of the examples from our UK member past creations, in the next blog entry we will continue with more of the partners.

Monday, 21 September 2015

COE materials on EDC/HRE



Who is not familiar with the principles of democratic citizenship and human rights? Valuing diversity, including everyone, giving everybody equal chances. They all play a big role in building fair and peaceful societies.

But are these principles actually applied in real life?

It’s up to each and every one of us to make sure that they are. All citizens need to have their say in the decisions which affect themselves and their communities.

What can we all do to make these ideals possible, and above all, how can education be of help?

For all those involved in teaching democratic skills – schools, families, youth associations and individuals – the Council of Europe has a collection of free and easy to use resources.

The children’s brochure Charter for all and the poster “Democracy and Human Rights Start with us!” are available online and as hard copies in a number of languages specified on the website.

source: COE

Friday, 18 September 2015

ENGAGE members materials - Arbeitskreis deutscher Bildungsstätten (AdB)


ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE that are relevant in the members of the consortiums national context.

 
The following are three websites connected to children right education in Germany.

The HANISAULAND (engl Hipharppigland)
https://www.hanisauland.de/ (engl version: https://www.hanisauland.de/en/en_index.html)


"Hipharpigland" is a easy entry resource run by the federal agency for civic education. A children’s Internet site with orienting towards a a political theme. The name "Hipharpigland" refers to the land of hippos, hares and pigs. These animals, together with others in a comic, have lots of funny and exciting adventures. The inhabitants of hipharppigland are all trying to run a democracy together. There is already a government with Chancellor Barbara Broadfoot, Foreign Minister Earnest and Interior Minister Harold. But actually there is not much else that works.

The website includes a lot of games, resources, films, materials which are designed for childrens use and help the to develop media cpompetences as well as learn about politics and critical refelction about media.

There is a teachers/school- section with tons of materials for use in school, as well as a parents section that helps adults understanding how they can assist their children.

-
KinderRechteSchulen
http://www.kinderrechteschulen.de/


 
This is a web based resource on childrens rights supporting and enabling schools, which is run by the organization MAKISTA (MAcht KInder STArk, engl:  make children become strong).

The site offers resources on the process of developing childrens rights enabling schools.



 
-

And KinderPolitik
http://www.kinderpolitik.de/bausteine




Is a resource offered by the german section of UNICEF. It contains a large compendium of concrete resources, tools and methods on children and young peoples´ participation, that can be applied in any educational and beyond context.




This were just some of our German member past creations, in the next blog entry we will continue with more of the members.


EDC for ALL project launches website at Forum de Juventude Algarve, Portugal (16-20.Sept 2015)


www.edcforall.eu

At the final Workshop of the EDC for ALL partnership in Faro/Portugal the project partners conducted a training on the newly developed educational games S/intro (card gae) and Filosu (dice game) in the frame of the Algare Youth Forum. Also during the Youth forum the new project website www.edcforall.eu was launched. The website contains all educational materials and games developed in the project.
Coming slowly into its final stage the partnership agreed at the final tasks to be conducted in the frame of the project EDC for ALL, which are the print and send out of educational materials and the manufacturing of the two educational games S/intro and ja!do.

Friday, 11 September 2015

ENGAGE members materials - Cives Foundation





ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship - is a project organized by 11 organizations from the European Union with expertise in education for citizenship for pupils aged 8-12 and their teachers.

During the following blog entries we will share some of the previously created tools by these organizations.


The first one that we are showing you is from Cives Foundation.

Rayuela.org is a website teaching human rights and participation to Spanish Children.


With information on gender equality, nationality, health, family, education, free time, participation and many other children rights, Rayuela is a tool with games and interactive applications. It also shares external links of good movies and books for supporting children education.

Next week we continue with more tools from our ENGAGE members, stay tuned.

Thursday, 23 July 2015

COE: Invitation to take part in testing descriptors for Competences for Democratic Culture from July to mid-September 2015

As you know, the Council of Europe’s Education Department, in co-operation with numerous international experts, has developed a new theoretical model of Competences for Democratic Culture. The next stage in the project was to compile a bank of descriptors that would help educators assess the extent to which a learner has acquired these competences. We would now like to invite education professionals at all levels and in all areas to take part in this project and respond to an online questionnaire to test the clarity and relevance of these descriptors.
The link below will take you to the Competences for Democratic Culture page on the Council of Europe’s Education website. There you will find a brief explanation of the project and the aim of the questionnaire as well as a link to the questionnaire itself in several languages. 
www.coe.int/competences  

As you will see in the introduction, it will take about 45 minutes to answer the questionnaire. In order to cover as many descriptors as possible there will eventually be up to 30 different questionnaires, each on 30 descriptors. Those who wish to do so are therefore welcome to fill in several questionnaires throughout the summer period. The questionnaires will be open until mid-September 2015. The results will enable us to select the most reliable descriptors for piloting in concrete learning contexts in 2016. The final full reference framework, comprising the model, descriptors and various support documents, will be published at the end of 2017.
We would also be very grateful indeed if you would send this link to your contacts and networks and encourage them to take part in this online consultation. The more responses we get, the more reliable the results of the consultation will be. 
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact my colleague Christopher Reynolds (in copy).

source: COE 
Directorate of Democratic Citizenship and Participation/DG Democracy
Council of Europe - Conseil de l'Europe

Friday, 17 July 2015

Call for registrations and papers for 6th International Human Rights Education Conference (Middelburg, Netherlands, 17-19 December 2015)

DARE member HREA and the University College Roosevelt (UCR) will co-organize the 6th International Human Rights Education Conference in Middelburg, the Netherlands on 17-19 December 2015. For instructions for the call for papers and to register, please visit the conference website: www.ihrec2015.org.
“Translating Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms to Today’s World” is the theme of the conference. In 1941, at the height of the World War II, US President Franklin Roosevelt famously called for the protection of four essential human freedoms everywhere in the world: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. These freedoms were an inspiration in the writing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, drafted over two years by the Commission on Human Rights under the chairmanship of Eleanor Roosevelt. Since its adoption in December 1948, the Universal Declaration has sparked struggles for social justice all over the world. At the same time, Roosevelt’s four freedoms are still far from realization – in many corners of the world.
Human rights education (HRE) has often been identified as the key connection between the lofty language in human rights treaties and a more just global and local order. Education is key in strengthening knowledge of human rights, supporting them and developing skills to realize them. Since the start of the UN Decade of Human Rights Education twenty years ago, enormous strides have been made in this field. At the same time, many questions remain. To what extent, in today’s context of globalization and fragmentation, can human rights be translated into local action? What gets lost in claims for human rights? How to introduce human rights-based approaches in fields such as health care, education and combating poverty?
The International Human Rights Education Conference is an annual event that brings together experts and scholars of human rights education from all over the world. Past conference speakers include Nobel Peace Prize winners, government ministers and ombudsmen from various countries, members of regional and international organizations, senior government officials, and scholars from leading universities and research centers and civil society. After earlier editions in Australia, South Africa, Poland, Taiwan and the United States, the 6th edition of the International Human Rights Education Conference will take place in the Netherlands.
For instructions for the call for papers and to register, please visit the conference website: www.ihrec2015.org.

Tuesday, 30 June 2015

NECE Conference 2015 “´Us` and ´Them`: Citizenship Education in an Interdependent World” - Call for Papers and Projects

To prepare the NECE Conference 2015 “´Us` and ´Them`: Citizenship Education in an Interdependent World”, the NECE Network is launching a call for projects and papers. Interested parties from NGOs, foundations, associations, multipliers and responsible bodies from schools, non-formal and informal citizenship education as well as from cultural education entities from all over Europe and North Africa are invited to submit proposals for the presentation of their work in the accompanying project market and/ or academic papers. The organizers of the NECE Conference will choose a selected number of papers / projects from the submissions. Successful projects / papers will be included in the programme development and they will contribute to the participative character of the event. Selected submissions might also be invited to the workshops at the NECE Conference 2015.

The focus of the submissions should be the causes, processes and consequences of “othering” for citizenship education. The projects / models / ideas / academic papers should refer to the three central thematic areas of the conference and illustrate their connection to civic education:

“The EU in Crisis”: The impact of Europe’s economic and political division, which has triggered discourses fuelled by fears and dissociation in the core countries of the EU and nationalistic and populist movements in core countries as well as in the southern periphery of the EU.
“´The West` and the ´Islamic World`”: The perception of a clash of civilizations between the ‘West’ and the ‘Islamic World’ which is leading to dangerous developments on both sides of the Mediterranean.
“Russia, Ukraine and ´the West`”: The repercussions of the Russian-Ukrainian conflict and the challenges for civil society in Eastern Europe and Russia to cope with situations of war and ideological and nationalist regression and hatred.


Please, find attached the entry conditions, terms and deadlines as well as the programme.

We are looking forward to your participation!


E-Mail: nece-call@lab-concepts.de
Web: www.lab-concepts.de


More information about NECE you may find here: www.nece.eu
Follow NECE at twitter and linkedIn.

Call for papers - 6th International Human Rights Education Conference (Middelburg, 17-19 December 2015)

Dear Colleagues,
The Organizing Committee of the 6th annual International Human Rights Education Conference, “Translating Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms to Today’s World”, warmly welcomes submissions for panel and paper proposals for presentation at the conference.
In 1941, at the height of the World War II, US President Franklin Roosevelt famously called for the protection of four essential human freedoms everywhere in the world: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. These freedoms were an inspiration in the writing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, drafted over two years by the Commission on Human Rights under the chairmanship of Eleanor Roosevelt. Since its adoption in December 1948, the Universal Declaration has sparked struggles for social justice all over the world. At the same time, Roosevelt’s four freedoms are still far from realization – in many corners of the world.
Human rights education (HRE) has often been identified as the key connection between the lofty language in human rights treaties and a more just global and local order. Education is key in strengthening knowledge of human rights, supporting them and developing skills to realize them. Since the start of the UN Decade of Human Rights Education twenty years ago, enormous strides have been made in this field. At the same time, many questions remain. To what extent, in today’s context of globalization and fragmentation, can human rights be translated into local action? What gets lost in claims for human rights? How to introduce human rights-based approaches in fields such as health care, education and combating poverty?
The International Human Rights Education Conference is an annual event that brings together experts and scholars of human rights education from all over the world. Past conference speakers include Nobel Peace Prize winners, government ministers and ombudsmen from various countries, members of regional and international organizations, senior government officials, and scholars from leading universities and research centers and civil society. After earlier editions in Australia, South Africa, Poland, Taiwan and the United States, the 6th edition of the International Human Rights Education Conference will take place in the Netherlands.
The conference has a number of objectives. For one, it seeks to support and promote the United Nations’ objectives in HRE. Second, it seeks to critically assess the way in which objectives in the field of human rights education can be translated into practices, for different groups, and in different educational contexts. Here, as a third objective, the conference seeks to highlight the role that specific actors can play in this process. A final, more historical objective is to assess the connection between Roosevelt’s four freedoms and human rights today.
The conference will be held in the medieval city of Middelburg which is conveniently located between Brussels, the heart of the European Union, and The Hague, the International City of Peace and Justice. Middelburg is the capital of Zeeland, the province from which the Roosevelt family emigrated, and it hosts the International Four Freedoms Awards every other year. The conference will include excursions to the international tribunals in The Hague and to the liberation route, commemorating World War II.
Further information can be found on the conference website: www.ihrec2015.org
Participants are welcome to propose their own panels, with a minimum of four papers, to organize a session with a specific working group or network, or to submit individual paper proposals. We particularly welcome papers on the following themes:
      1.     Global trends in human rights education
  • Education for global citizenship and human rights education
  • Translating the UN framework on human rights education into practice

    2.     Analyzing key actors in human rights education
  • Equipping educators for human rights education
  • Human rights education and the state
  • The role of non-state actors in human rights education
  • The role of professional organizations in human rights education
  • The role of human rights museums and memorials in human rights education
  • National human rights institutions and human rights education
  • Human rights cities and human rights education at the local level
  • National action plans – a comparative perspective
      3.     Current themes in human rights education
  • Critical human rights education
  • The use of new media in human rights education 
  • Holocaust education
  • Human rights education and anti-radicalization: critical perspectives
  • Education around specific themes, like children’s rights, women’s rights, rights of minorities, and racial discrimination
       4.     The practice of human rights education
  • The pedagogics of human rights education
  • Translating the Roosevelt legacy into educational practices
  • Measuring the impact of human rights education – empirical examples
  • The vernacularization of human rights
  • Human rights in higher education

Instructions for the submission of abstracts and panels
  1. For individual papers, abstracts of 250 words are expected by September 6, 2015. The abstract should include a title, the name of the author(s) and their institutional affiliation with the country concerned (these do not count towards the word count).
  2. For panels, a general description of 200 words, and a minimum of four abstracts of 250 words, are expected by September 6, 2015. Panel proposals should also include a moderator.
  3. Should you wish to organize a special session with a network, please contact the conference organizers before September 6, 2015.
  4. Abstracts should be sent to IHREC-2015@hrea.org and will be reviewed for their relevance, academic merit, and timeliness. Authors will be notified by email before September 28.
Please submit any questions regarding this call for papers to Laelia Dard-Dascot at ldarddascot@ucr.nl.

Registration for the conference
The conference is open to anyone interested in human rights education. The registration process will start in the second week of July.
Sincerely,
Prof. Barbara Oomen, Dean, University College Roosevelt
Frank Elbers, Executive Director, HREA

Thursday, 25 June 2015

ENGAGE routemap



ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship - is on its process to create a European interactive, innovative, pedagogical and multilingual module on education for citizenship for pupils aged 8-12 and their teachers.

How is this process going to happen?


ENGAGE is shaped following Nine main steps:

1) Setting-up the national consortiums (or « working groups ») and making a national need assessment: each partner, except DARE Network, is in charge of setting-up a national consortium.
The national consortium are cross-sectoral.
Composition : the national lead organization ; one or several scools and teachers representing the formal education sector ;
one academic researcher expert on the issue of education for citizenship ; one public authority (local, regional or national).

Missions : it will conduct a national need assessment in the field of education for citizenship, via a theoritical and empirical study. The results of this study will be summarized in a paper. This paper will help us define the content of the European learning material.
Moreover, the national consortium will have to train at least 15 teachers (ideally 5 in 3 schools) to use the learning material on education for citizenship. This will enable our learning material to undergo a phase test in those same schools.
Then, the national consortium will disseminate the results of the project in its own network, and will try to use the material in its diverse activities as much as possible (during trainings, seminars, conferences etc.).
In total, 6 meetings will have to be organized in each member State over two years.

2) Intellectual production : each partner will write a document on the state of education for citizenship in its country, as well as other documents on national specific issues identified during the national need assessment.

3) Translation of the intellectual production in 5 languages ;

4) Creation of the online interactive European learning material on education for citizenship : available in 5 languages, meant to be used by teachers and students aged 8-12.
It will enable teachers to access all the « intellectual production » of the project (one document on education for citizenship per country ; thematic documents ; documents on innovative educational approcaches to use in the classroom...). Students will also use this online platform (interactive workshops in which they can play or work alone or with other students from other schools or countries).
Each partner will participate in the co-construction of the online learning material, which will tackle both European issues and national ones, making it flexible.

5) Teacher training : it will be done by each national coordinator. Ideally, at least 15 teachers will be trained, 5 in 3 schools. The trainings will take place over two days. They will address both the use of the interactive learning material (its educational approach) and the content.

6) Test-phase in schools concucted by national consortiums : each national consortium will target at least three schools. An observer will be sent to analyse this phase. Then, a questionnaire will be sent to teachers and students who took part in this study. The learning material will be modified depending on the results of this phase.

7) Launching event in Paris : all partners will be present, as well as teachers involved in the creation of the learning material. We will have with us national education inspectors, representatives from youth and popular education structures, from the Ligue de l'Enseignement, the European Civic Forum, the French Education Ministry, the European Commission, the European Parliament Education and Culture Commission, the Council of Europe etc.

8) Dissemination and promotion of our production : the DARE Network will be in charge of promoting our production at the European level.
Each partner will also have to disseminate it within its network.

9) European meetings to mutualize the results and conclusions drawn at the national level by the national consortiums: four meetings take place over two years.
The first in Paris to shape the process of the project and agree on the consortiums compositions; 
The second in Madrid to put together the theoretical and empirical needs assessments and start the learning material production process; 
The third in Warsaw to put together the intellectual productions and start the testing process;
The forth in Strassbourg to share the final results and celebrate.

Thursday, 18 June 2015

Meet the ENGAGE partnership (2/2)




ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship.

The project ENGAGE is a partnership between eight organizations in seven EU member states.

As we started showing you last week, we will continue with the rest of the members of the ENGAGE partnership, in these case, the three of them DARE members:


Organization name: polis – The Austrian Centre for Citizenship Education in Schools

Country: Austria

Contact person: Maria Haupt & Elisabeth Turek



polis – The Austrian Centre for Citizenship Education in Schools is the central education service institution for citizenship education in schools. The centre helps teachers to bring citizenship and human rights education into the classroom, serves as an information platform and advisory centre, develops new materials for the classroom on a regular basis, plays a part in the European and Austrian discussions on citizenship education, has an influential role in teacher training and organizes events for students.
With the activities on offer, polis supports skills- and competence-oriented teaching, the aim of which is a political awareness, which the student has reached through careful deliberation. In this respect, it is not primarily a question of the acquisition of the broadest possible range of knowledge, but of learning activities, which enable the student to learn about, think about and deal with political themes. The activities are therefore linked to the lives and experiences of the students themselves.
Organisation name:  Cives Foundation
Country: Spain
Contact person: Edurne Grau


Cives Foundation promotes civic and ethical education, based on the tradition of secular humanism and pluralism. Its board is composed by teachers, professors, and experts involved in the educational community. Cives believes in education as an important tool to create citizens with strong democratic values based on solidarity, critical thinking, interculturallity and tolerance.
Cives was founded and shares board with the NGO ‘Liga Española de la Educación y la Cultura Popular’. All of our actions are base on the pillars of secularism, solidarity and citizenship.


Organisation name: Arbeitskreis deutscher Bildungsstätten (AdB) e.V.
Country: Germany
Contact person: Georg Pirker

Website: www.adb.de
AdB is an association made up of approximately 170 continuing education centres throughout Germany with various profiles - youth education centres, adult education centres, academies, Europe centres, educational centres of party-related foundations and international encounter centres. As a whole these independent educational organisations represent a wide spectrum of various training offers as well as organisational structures. The Association of German Educational Organisations (AdB) was founded in 1959 as a registered association. The educational organisations which comprise the AdB are represented by individual members. AdB is a pluralistic, content-independent association that offers to its members comprehensive information on the association and civic education, concrete assistance and a forum for international exchange on the basis of its non-partisan expertise and wide spectrum of subjects covered. AdB is supported by the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth.
AdB aims to preserve and promote civic education as an important element of democracy. Democracy is not only a form of government, but needs to be experienced and promulgated in the daily lives of citizens. Civic education is a training field for democracy. Through their training offers, the member organisations of the association strive to motivate and enable citizens to recognize the relationship between political framework conditions and their own lives, play an active role in public affairs and participate in the making of society and political processes. The member organisations see themselves as places of encounter between people of different cultures, demographic groups and worlds. As a specialised organisation of civic education AdB fosters an exchange of information and experience, training and a joint representation of interests in the area of civic education. AdB actively contributes professional discussions on civic education and advocates a European Educational Network for Human Rights and Democracy. AdB is commited the realisation of equal opportunities in all fields of work.
AdB provides: a forum for the analysis of the fundamental and current questions and problems of youth and adult education; working groups, in which key points of various fields of work are debated, positions are formulated, educational tools are developed and information on training, youth, didactic and economic contents is presented; further training possibilities via conferences and workshops at which important themes are treated and discussed with experts; we organize and conduct bi-national and international specialised programmes for staff in youth work. At present AdB cooperates with partner organisations in Israel, Russia, Portugal, Poland, Mongolia, Tunisia and is active in various european bodies aiming for supporting training projects for the set-up of democratic education; AdB also supports trainers through governmental funding who form a working group, in which innovative models of political youth training are developed.
In Germany AdB cooperates with similar associations and is represented in numerous political bodies of youth and adult education targeting to national and international levels. In addition AdB is a member of: the Working Society for Youth Assistance in Germany (AGJ), the German Federal Committee for Political and Civic Education, which we also manage (bap), the DARE network (Democracy and Human Rights Education in Europe), the German Institute for Adult Education (DIE), the European Association of Adult Education (EAEA), the International Youth Exchange Service (IJAB) and the House of Youth Work in Germany
AdB offers information on education for democratic cooperaton/human rights education (EDC/HRE) activities in its quarterly magazine entitled "Außerschulische Bildung", in which the main points of civic education and the debate on current educational issues is fostered from the perspective of non-formal educational practice. Furthermore, AdB documents individual projects and areas of work in numerous brochures and reports.