Thursday, 17 December 2015

"EDC for All" game package: S+intro and ja!do - ready for sendout!!!


Here they are: two brand new educational games ready for sendout to the EDC/HRE community: 
The supernice looking EDC for ALL game sets include the two newly developed games ja/do and S*intro. The games have been developed as part of the EU supported "EDC for All"- project. 

Based on an EDC games stocktaking study both games have been developed by educational experts from 3 countries and have been extensively tested and reviewed in dozens of non-formal educational trainings during the last two years in Europe and beyond. Both proove to make the difference. 
The games offer unique easy entry educational approaches to soundly work with any group of people on questions of justice and equality,  participation and inlcusion and have the potential to boost EDC work to another dimension.

The game set is availably in three languages: English, Portugese and German.
If you are interested to make use of them and want to order a set please send an email to pirker@adb.de .

More information on the project EDC for all you can find on www.edcforall.eu






Thursday, 10 December 2015

Unicef - Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship



ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE children participation.



The following is the third of three relevant materials from Unicef.

Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship is an educational essay for practitioners working on children rights and children participation education.

A nation is democratic to the extent that its citizens are involved, particularly at the community level. The confidence and competence to be involved must be gradually acquired through practice. It is for this reason that there should be gradually increasing opportunities for children to participate in any aspiring democracy, and particularly in those nations already convinced that they are democratic. With the growth of children’s rights we are beginning to see an increasing recognition of children’s abilities to speak for themselves. Regrettably, while children’s and youths’ participation does occur in different degrees around the world, it is often exploitative or frivolous.

This Essay is written for people who know that young people have something to say but who would like to reflect further on the process. It is also written for those people who have it in their power to assist children in having a voice, but who, unwittingly or not, trivialize their involvement.

For more information and link to the pdf version of the document, follow this link:

http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/100

Thursday, 3 December 2015

UNICEF Child Rights Education Toolkit: Rooting Child Rights in Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Schools


 
ENGAGE - Building together European learning material on Education for Citizenship

We continue the blog entries with materials connected with ENGAGE children participation.



The following is the second of three relevant materials from Unicef.

UNICEF Child Rights Education Toolkit: Rooting Child Rights in Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Schools is a toolkit for practitioners working on children rights education.

The toolkit defines what is meant by child rights education and the child rights approach. The toolkit explains the relevance of child rights education to UNICEF’s mission and the ways in which education can take place in a range of contexts--including with professionals, caregivers, the corporate sector, the media, and children’s groups.

The toolkit uses the metaphor of a tree to explore child rights education in the context of school-based initiatives that promote learning about rights, learning through rights (using rights as an organizing principle to transform the culture of learning) and learning for rights (taking action to realize rights), in an overall context of learning as a right. It contains a range of practical tools, checklists, mapping exercises, project examples and evidence of the benefits of high quality child rights education.

Although the approaches in the toolkit are relevant for all countries, this is the first edition and focuses on the work of National Committees in high-income countries. A second edition in the future will also cover the related work of UNICEF country offices.


For more information and link to the pdf version of the document, follow this link:

http://www.unicef.org/crc/index_30184.html