Tuesday, 16 September 2008

Human Rights Training for Adults: What Twenty-Six Evaluation Studies Say About Design, Implementation and Follow-Up


The first issue in HREA's Research in Human Rights Education Papers has appeared. The paper is a comparative study on models of human rights training. "Human Rights Training for Adults: What Twenty-six Evaluation Studies Say About Design, Implementation and Follow-Up" examines trainings for human rights defenders, police officers, government officials and the general public.

Among its main recommendations are: 1) programmes need to more consistently deliver the interactive, experiential and transformative adult education methodologies that they all agree are essential to effective human rights training; 2) programmes need to emphasise comprehensive mechanisms to follow-up with participants after the formal training programme is complete; and 3) programmes should explore how they might carry out reliable and comprehensive research and documentation of their work as the HRE field as a whole lacks solid longitudinal evaluation data on the long-term impact of human rights trainings on participants.

The Research in Human Rights Education Paper Series intends to foster and disseminate research and evaluation in the practice of human rights education, training and learning. Through the Research in Human Rights Education Papers HREA hopes to encourage more research on the impact of human rights education and make the results available to practitioners, to academics and to funders.

Human Rights Training for Adults: What Twenty-Six Evaluation Studies Say About Design, Implementation and Follow-Up (PDF file)
Katharine Teleki, August 2007 (Issue no. 1), 35 pages