Monday, 24 September 2012

Guidelines on Human Rights Education for Law Enforcement Officials and Secondary School Systems

The OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) presented two new sets of guidelines on human rights education at the OSCE’s annual Human Dimension Implementation Meeting in Warsaw on 24 September 2012.

The Guidelines on Human Rights Education for Law Enforcement Officials and the Guidelines on Human Rights Education for Secondary School Systems were produced to promote effective human rights education and to support OSCE participating States in the implementation of their human dimension commitments in this area.

(L-r) Snježana Bokulić, the Head of ODIHR’s Human Rights Department, presents ODIHR’s new human rights education guidelines for law enforcement officials and secondary schools, together with Pavel Chacuk, a Human Rights Adviser at ODIHR; Felisa Tibbitts of Human Rights Associates (HREA) and the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and Cristina Sganga, Human Rights Trainer and Adviser. Warsaw, 24 September 2012.
“The Guidelines were developed in recognition of the key role law enforcement officials play in safeguarding human rights, as well as the importance of schools in helping young people better understand and defend their rights,” said Snježana Bokulić, the Head of ODIHR’s Human Rights Department.

The publications offer guidance on developing curricula, enhancing the teaching and learning experience, preparing teachers and trainers, and evaluating the work done.

The Guidelines on Human Rights Education for Law Enforcement Officials are designed for decision-makers, police trainers, university lecturers, as well as for national human rights institutions and non-governmental organizations. The publication stresses that human rights should be an integral part of all training programmes for law enforcement officials, in such areas as investigation and arrest, the use of firearms and force and communication with the public.

The Guidelines on Human Rights Education for Secondary School Systems are intended for relevant programme designers, teachers, policymakers and other stakeholders. The publications are available both online and in print.

Caption with image: (L-r) Snježana Bokulić, the Head of ODIHR’s Human Rights Department, presents ODIHR’s new human rights education guidelines for law enforcement officials and secondary schools, together with Pavel Chacuk, a Human Rights Adviser at ODIHR; Felisa Tibbitts of Human Rights Associates (HREA) and the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and Cristina Sganga, Human Rights Trainer and Adviser. Warsaw, 24 September 2012.