Tuesday, 20 June 2017

Learning to Live Together: a Shared Commitment to Democracy

Conference on the Future Citizenship and Human Rights Education in Europe

http://bit.ly/2sKcPFt
Strasbourg, 19.06.2017 - How to integrate migrants and refugees successfully? How to prevent violent radicalisation without creating a climate of mistrust, suspicion and discrimination? How can education address the growing divide between the elites and the ordinary people?

In order to reply to these questions, the Council of Europe will provide a platform for discussion to highlight how Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education help to fight discrimination, intolerance and extremism. These major challenges will be addressed at the international conference, Learning to Live Together: a Shared Commitment to Democracy (Palais de l'Europe, 20-22 June; Programme - hashtag: #CoE_Charter4All).


Wednesday, 14 June 2017

UNESCO: More efforts are needed to mainstream values like tolerance and the appreciation of cultural diversity within National Education Policies

(c) UNESCO
An analysis of different themes and concepts associated with Global Citizenship Education (GCED) reveals that within the main topics associated with GCED, appreciation of cultural diversity and tolerance are less likely to be reflected in national education policies, curriculum and teacher education.

UNESCO commissioned an analysis of the country reports to the fourth and fifth consultations on the implementation of the Recommendation concerning Education for International Understanding, Cooperation and Peace and Education relating to Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (1974) in light of Target 4.7 of the Sustainable Development Goal on Education. The analysis included 57 reports from 2012. These series of key findings are presented ahead of the forthcoming data from 2016.

The analysis of country reports from 2012, found that concepts related to human rights and fundamental freedoms, and peace and non-violence are broadly included in the national education policies (88%), curriculum (86% and 72% respectively) and in teacher education (54% and 16% respectively).